What should be borne in mind at the first visit to Iceland

What should be borne in mind at the first visit to Iceland

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What should be borne in mind at the first visit to Iceland

If you’ve always wanted to go to Iceland in July – it’s time for this. Knowing that some things in this beautiful country at the first visit will seem strange to you, we have compiled a list of five local features, which is worth remembering.

Tap water Iceland

What should be borne in mind at the first visit to Iceland

If you – one of those tourists who go straight from the airport to the supermarket to buy 10 liters of water per stay, I’ll be quiet chuckle over you behind your back. Icelandic drink tap water is completely safe and there is nothing about what could be worrying. You do not need to filter it, and, of course, no need to buy water. The supermarket sold the same water! You may find that her scent as many say resembles rotten eggs, but it – the smell of geothermal hot water (sulfur, to be exact), and not contamination. If you feel that smell when you turn on the cold water, just wait a few seconds and it will go away. In some areas, such as in Borgarnes, for example, cold water will still smell a bit, but still it is quite safe to drink, and even useful.

Icelandic money Iceland

What should be borne in mind at the first visit to Iceland

Currency in Iceland called Iceland Krona denoted ISK or sometimes (erroneously) IKR. Euro, despite popular belief, is not the official currency in Iceland. Many travel companies will display their prices in euros only (which I believe is illegal in accordance with Icelandic law, but that’s another story), but it is mainly for your convenience. Once you arrive in Iceland, you’ll need to use the Icelandic krona in most places. Icelanders do not like to carry cash, preferring to pay off the cards, and you too will be able to use their cards almost anywhere. The only exception, perhaps, are urban buses, where you will have to pay the exact amount of the conductors, because they can not give change. Due to the fact that not many banks outside Iceland take ISK you’ll be glad to know that the bank and ATM, where you can exchange your currency at the airport Keflavik have.

Buying alcohol Iceland

What should be borne in mind at the first visit to Iceland

In Iceland, you can not buy alcohol in supermarkets. The only places where you can buy it – specialized state alcohol stores, called “Vinbudin.” You can find small outlets “Vinbudin” in many cities across the country, but if you’re in the center of Reykjavik, the closest – across the street from “Landromat Cafe.” There is another in the mall “Kringlan” (and also “Smaralind”). Exact locations of alcohol shops can be found on the website “Vinbudin.”

Public showers Iceland

What should be borne in mind at the first visit to Iceland

If you want to relax in one of these stunning Icelandic geothermal pools, you have to take a shower naked before you go there. My advice to you humble yourself and relax, because there is no chance to avoid it. For example, I hate the way from the shower to the pool a lot more than the actual taking a shower. During this flimsy my biceps are exposed for all to see, and it’s worse because of the embarrassment of women who happen to go to the shower at the same time with me. And I do not really see anything wrong with that another woman can catch a glimpse of my loins. Their bikini also do not really hide a lot. After another visit to America earlier this year, I also find it quite amusing that most Americans complain about it. But, at the same time, they are all happy to use public toilets in America with such a huge gap in the booths that everyone can see all of their personal belongings (seriously, what’s wrong with you?). If I had to choose between voyeurism and peeping in the shower in the toilet, I would happily blinking every time.

Abandoned baby strollers Iceland

What should be borne in mind at the first visit to Iceland

It is also important to know that if you see a seemingly forgotten all buggy walking down the Laugarvegur, fully equipped, with a sleeping child in it, do not rush to call the police, until you are sure that his parents do not sip coffee at a nearby cafe. For Iceland’s perfectly normal to leave a sleeping baby outside (most of the Icelandic children sleeping on the street every day from an early age), and be sure that there is someone who is watching through a window or a child using a baby monitor. This is not a parental irresponsibility, nobody is going to steal it, and in general, he’ll be fine.

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