INTEL WILL USE WEARABLE ELECTRONICS TO STUDY PARKINSON’S DISEASE

INTEL WILL USE WEARABLE ELECTRONICS TO STUDY PARKINSON’S DISEASE

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INTEL WILL USE WEARABLE ELECTRONICS TO STUDY PARKINSON'S DISEASE

Today is easy to find a portable device that can track your activities at any time of the day.However, monitoring of large groups of people is more difficult. A number of major technology companies such as Apple, Samsung, and Google, are now trying to find a solution to this problem.

Intel announced a partnership with the Michael J. Fox Foundation, which will be directed to monitoring and analysis of Parkinson’s disease using wearable devices. The hope is that by using a portable device, you get better control of symptoms and possibly find a cure for Parkinson’s disease.

To monitor disease device will consist of the “iron” from Intel, and additional software, which includes applications for mobile handheld devices and the platform for processing analytical data.

To equip the study patients suffering from Parkinson’s Disease Research Center Michael J. Fox Foundation will provide surveillance for the disease. As an added bonus for people who do not live close to a research institution, will be able to maintain a constant connection with the Fund.

Over the past few years, Intel has become increasingly interested in wearable technologies that can be used not only to capture the market of ordinary consumers than is currently engaged in Google, introducing Android Wear. Intel is more concerned about how these portable devices can be used for science, according to CNet.

“We can collect data to improve research and better understand the behavior and the progression of the disease,” – said the general manager of Big Data Solutions by Intel.

The company has tested its technology on sixteen patients with Parkinson’s disease , nine of which were part of the control group and wore watches Pebble for 4 days. Using these devices, Intel hopes to record tremor, movement during sleep and walk, as well as the balance of the person.

The reason for the study of the disease served as the former CEO Andy Grove, who joined the fund Fox’s Foundation and donated millions on research and development.