“The Book Thief”: to keep humanity – Review

“The Book Thief”: to keep humanity – Review

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“Surely you will die,” he warns in the first scene of the film genteel narrator speaking velvet voice of Roger Allam. Liesel Meminger history from the beginning strongly marked by the stigma of death, understood in the literal sense as well as a truly literary. The history of the title “thief books,” her adoptive family and friends because the most knowledgeable advocates on the issue of dying narrator – Death. While the image we see an older gentleman with a scythe, in almost every frame feel his presence. Besides, he regularly reminds of its existence, the light tone commenting on war events, against one what a fairytale Hollywood movie show was not proper.

“The Book Thief” is a best-selling novel screening Markus Zusaka with the same title. In 1938, 9-year-old Liesel Meminger (fantastic Sophie Nelisse !) and her younger brother, Werner, children Communists lose their father and are separated from the mother. When you travel to a fictional Molching on the outskirts of Munich, where the siblings to be adopted by marriage Hubermannów, the boy dies and is buried near the railway tracks. Desperate Liesel impulsively steals the first book – as it turns out, “Handbook gravedigger”. The first day in a new home are not easy. Raw Rosa ( Emily Watson ) continually drills girl and soon comes to light that Liesel can not read, which becomes the object of ridicule. In defense of a new friend is older by three years Rudy (Nico Liersch) – “Boy with yellow hair like lemon,” and the study helps to warm and gracious Hans Hubermann ( Geoffrey Rush ). With time reading Liesel becomes not only an absorbing hobby, but a way of establishing a relationship with another man, and domestication of war trauma. When the roof goes Hubermannów Jew Max (Ben Schnetzer), the heroine befriends a man by the common reading. Hiding in the basement Max prepares for a girl unusual gift – replaces the erased part white paint “Mein Kampf” and give volume Liesel to encourage her to create their own history.

Brian Percival in his film grabs on the analysis of the state of mind of the Germans intoxicated Nazi ideology instead of trying to explain, inquire, what made Hitler so easily snatched the crowds and convinced millions to reject the humanity in favor of mindless follow the false authority (the contrast Margarethe von Trotta tells the interesting ” Hannah Arendt “, which can also be seen in cinemas now). The director focuses on the observation of everyday life in Germany on the eve of the outbreak of the Second World War and during the conflict, weaving hell reflection on how the Nazis inflicted on his own people. Most attention is paid Percival Liesel and her peers, showing childhood spent in a Nazi school, marked by hunger and the constant fear of death. Children do not understand the ideology, they feel lost in the new reality, and the adults are not able to explain why people disappear, why do not cheer for the black athletes, why are books burned.

Creator of “The Book Thief” wins the absurdities of German reality through a simple, yet contrasts customs. Percival perfectly uses music to build the mood of individual fragments. In memory falls primarily beautifully designed on the scene – carrying associations with iconic sequence of the baptism of “The Godfather” Coppola – where singing, children laughing faces against the swastikas are an accompaniment to the tragic events of “Kristallnacht”. Elsewhere muffled sounds of bombing are wrapped cylinders “The Blue Danube” by Johann Strauss in the accordion arrangement. It is difficult for a more eloquent commentary on the collapse of the German and Austrian culture.

“The Book Thief” is the story of a love for the written word in the guise of a fairy tale. A well-written script, pierwszoligowi actors and touching story make this – in fact, after stamping production – watch perfectly. Percivalowi managed to avoid the emotional blackmail that can ruin even the best literary material (memorable accident filming a very good novel “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” by Jonathan Safran Foer) Although war trauma in the “thief of books” is slightly dusted with icing Hollywood, the ending has little in common with the typical “Dream Factory” happy ending.

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